Generating (Maven) Projects

Introduction

The first thing we do when starting a new application is setting up our project. A lot of people use Maven for this, and you have various options how you can do this.
Since I create a lot of projects for testing out various features of the Atbash projects or for trying things out (I have around 300 projects on my computer today) I was searching for some help to do this.

Application setup

When trying things out, I need to have some minimal project setup. Not only do I need the Maven pom file with the required dependencies, I also need some files like configuration or a login file for Octopus.

I do not need to have tools to generate me the JPA entities, JSF Screens or JAX-RS endpoints. Creating a few of them is not difficult with the current IDE’s and that automatic generation is mostly too opinionated so that it is not usable in production systems either.

So what are the options to have this minimal project setup

Copy and Paste

You can always copy such a minimal project you have already created and made some modifications to

  • Change the groupId and artifactId of the pom file
  • Update the dependencies
  • Update the configuration file to match your new dependencies and use case you want to test out.
  • Change the java package with your java code
  • Add or remove code depending on the feature for this use case.

This is a valid procedure and in most cases the most efficient one. You don’t need to learn any new tool, extend it with your features (Like Octopus in my case) but of course, it is not the most fun way of doing things.

JBoss Forge

JBoss Forge https://forge.jboss.org/ is a tool specifically designed to get your application up and running fast. It not only generates the project for you but also can help you in generating those well-structured classes like JPA entities, JAX-RS endpoints, and screens with JSF or Angular(JS).

I used it in the past and it can be a valuable tool but it is not the right thing for what I want.
Although you can generate your maven project, you need a script and/or a custom add-on for the features that I want (specific dependencies within the pom.xml file and some configuration and java files)

It also has a lot of options to generate code for you, but again this is sometimes opinionated and not what you or your company wants to use.

Other tools

Since there are various other tools on the internet, the topic seems to be important for a lot of people. Similar tools which I found are generjee and factorEE.
Not all of them are maintained anymore or do focus on the wrong things (for my use case) like generating code.
I also find a CLI very important in this case since it allows you to create an application very rapidly (and recreate it based on the same configuration)

Jessie

So, due to the lack of the right tool for me, I created one of my own called Jessie (Java EE Start project as it was geared at that time towards Java EE). Last year with the release of CDI 2.0, I did a rewrite of it using the Java SE CDI container and included the usage of ThymeLeaf as templating mechanism so that it became easier to generate files which can be customized.

In the OpenSource spirit of Atbash, I placed the code on Github  and created a front end for it.
You can play with it on the OpenShift V3 instance  or can download the code that just needs a few parameters within a YAML config file and the CLI version generates your project.

The first version has support for Java EE and additional frameworks like DeltaSpike, PrimeFaces, and Octopus, the security framework.

Since I’m also involved with MicroProfile lately, a version for MicroProfile and the support for the different vendor implementation like LibertyIO, WildFly Swarm, Payara Micro etc will be created later on.

Conclusion

When setting up a new project, the most efficient solution is creating it from scratch or start from a similar existing project and make the required adaptations.
Another useful tool is JBoss Forge, mainly when you are interested in generating some code.

Jessie has been created a few years ago as a toy and now available on GitHub and it was a good learning opportunity for CDI 2.0, templating with ThymeLeaf and creating a tool which runs in multiple environments (CLI, Java FX, Web/JSF)

Maybe it is also helpful for you.

Have fun.

One Reply to “Generating (Maven) Projects”

  1. Looks great, Rudy!

    This is very similar to a GUI for maven project generator from an archetype that I started hacking on during last Christmas but haven’t finished. I’ll look at the source and will try to contribute.

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